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Doctor Who and the Death Factory at Noise=Noise, June 8th.

Montage by Vera Bremerton.
Next Friday I'll give an experimental presentation at Noise=Noise on the strange parallels between the sonic and conceptual dystopianism of Doctor Who and first generation British industrial music. Dr. Who exposed mass audiences (often very young) to a combination of experimental electronic sound and dystopian themes, a combination that could also summarise industrial music. Dr. Who frequently presented post-apocalyptic scenarios of mutation, mind control and para-militarised societies and, in the process, at least implicitly criticised actual political and technological developments of the time, particularly those associated with the Cold War arms race. Due to budgetary constraints these visionary scenarios were often realised in a rudimentary ad hoc fashion; an approach that also applies to industrial. The early industrial groups highlighted the most serious social and political themes using very primitive electronic equipment, creating a kind of “D.I.Y. monumentalism” that nevertheless had a wide and terrifying cultural impact. Sonically, the Dr. Who soundtracks produced by the BBC Radiophonic Workshop in the 1960s and 70s can now be heard as direct precursors of industrial and examples of this link will be presented. The way in which they encoded socio-technological terrors electronically could even support a classification of these soundtracks a type of proto-industrial music, itself dependent on some of industrial’s other precursors: Futurism, Bruitism and Musique Concréte.

Event details:

noise=noise theory 02.

EVOL
INIGO WILKINS
RYAN JORDAN
ALEXEI MONROE

8th June 19.00-23.00

nnnn
Unit 73a
Regent Studios
8 Andrews Road
E8 4QN

5 pounds.

Comments

Konrad Yarbrough said…
Wow! As a fan of both the Doctor and industrial music, I would love to see/hear/read this presentation. Sadly, I am also in Tulsa Oklahoma. Would it be horrible of me to request you post it in some manner?
a.m. said…
Thanks for your interest Konrad. The talk was an experiment and was well-received. I'm now refining it and it will definitely be published at some point. Watch this space...
Konrad said…
Bookmarked!

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